Category Archives: Internet

Dog Who Lost Puppies

Firefighters in Harrisburg, North Carolina, came to the rescue of an orange tabby cat who found herself in a very tight spot on Wednesday. Officials think Crystal was chasing something at her home when she fell and got herself wedged in between the chimney and the decorative siding that surrounds it. Her meows helped lead firefighters to her location within the two-story chimney, and they had her out within an hour. “We used our best judgment on where we thought she could be and pulled the boards off the side of the house and cut a hole in there, and no sooner than we were sticking our hands in, her head was sticking out of that hole,” said the fire department’s public information officer, David Bradshaw. “Immediately she said, ‘Hey, I’m getting out of here.’ She climbed out right into the firefighter’s arms.”

 

New Dwarf Primate Discovered in Africa

Researchers from the U.K. detected a new species of bush baby — a tiny, bug-eyed mammal — living deep in an African jungle. The team found the 6-inch mammal when it noticed one of the calls they were hearing didn’t sound anything like the 18 known species of bush baby, also known as a galago. The Angolan dwarf galago or Galagoides kumbirensis, is named for the forest where it was found. Unfortunately, the new species may already be endangered due to deforestation in its habitat. The species is described in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

 

Couple Postpones Wedding for Missing Dog

A Hollywood makeup artist and her fiancé, a Silicon Valley executive, are going all-out to try to find their beloved dog, who ran off from his pet sitter on Feb. 13. Trendee King and James Galley have put their wedding on hold as they search for Theo, a Brussels Griffon. They’ve hired a private investigator, passed out thousands of flyers, offered a $3,500 reward and taken to social media in their efforts to bring Theo home. King is still confident Theo will be found. “Theo is my best friend, we did everything together — grocery shopping, the dog park — we slept nose-to-nose,” King said. “There’s something in me that knows he’s alive and knows he’s OK. All of this is happening for a reason.”

Firefighters Save Dog From Cliff

A crew of 16 San Francisco firefighters came to the rescue of a dog who tumbled over a ledge and down a steep cliff in the Golden Gate National Recreation area on Wednesday. The dog got stuck on a ledge after the fall. The crew dropped ropes down the cliffside and lowered one firefighter down to get the dog. The firefighter and dog were then carefully pulled back up the embankment in a dramatic scene that was captured on video and shared on Twitter by the fire department. The dog was in an offleash area, but a spokesman for the San Francisco Fire Department recommends “animals need to be within range for verbal commands, and people need to be responsible and keep their animals away from the Cliffside.” However, he said the dog sitter who was with the pooch at the time did the right thing by calling for help instead of attempting to rescue the dog on his own.

 

Cat Owners Not at Risk for Psychosis

Past studies have found that kids who grow up with cats are at a higher risk for mental health issues linked to a parasite cats are known to carry. But a new study has good news for cat owners. “There is no evidence that cats pose a risk to children’s mental health,” said study lead author Francesca Solmi of University College London. For the new study, researchers analyzed data from nearly 5,000 kids born in England between 1991 and 1992, and followed them until they were 18. Overall, there was no link between cat ownership and symptoms of psychosis at ages 13 or 18. “Previous studies reporting links between cat ownership and psychosis simply failed to adequately control for other possible explanations” for the link, Solmi said. The study was published in the journal Psychological Medicine.

 

Giraffe Calf Gets Her Name at Maryland Zoo

Visitors at the Maryland Zoo have gotten their first glimpse of a female reticulated giraffe born on Feb. 6 to 4-year-old mom, Juma, and 11-year-old dad, Caesar. After a public vote, the zoo revealed Thursday that the baby has been named Willow. “Juma is an amazing mother! Her instincts are on target,” said Erin Cantwell, mammal collection manager. “She is very attentive and has been very patient with the calf as she learns to nurse. Mother and calf are bonding well and appear to be settling into their new routine with ease. All the other giraffes are curious about this new addition — it’s fun to watch them watching the calf.”

Cat Freed From Chimney

Firefighters in Harrisburg, North Carolina, came to the rescue of an orange tabby cat who found herself in a very tight spot on Wednesday. Officials think Crystal was chasing something at her home when she fell and got herself wedged in between the chimney and the decorative siding that surrounds it. Her meows helped lead firefighters to her location within the two-story chimney, and they had her out within an hour. “We used our best judgment on where we thought she could be and pulled the boards off the side of the house and cut a hole in there, and no sooner than we were sticking our hands in, her head was sticking out of that hole,” said the fire department’s public information officer, David Bradshaw. “Immediately she said, ‘Hey, I’m getting out of here.’ She climbed out right into the firefighter’s arms.”

 

New Dwarf Primate Discovered in Africa

Researchers from the U.K. detected a new species of bush baby — a tiny, bug-eyed mammal — living deep in an African jungle. The team found the 6-inch mammal when it noticed one of the calls they were hearing didn’t sound anything like the 18 known species of bush baby, also known as a galago. The Angolan dwarf galago or Galagoides kumbirensis, is named for the forest where it was found. Unfortunately, the new species may already be endangered due to deforestation in its habitat. The species is described in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

 

A Hollywood makeup artist and her fiancé, a Silicon Valley executive, are going all-out to try to find their beloved dog, who ran off from his pet sitter on Feb. 13. Trendee King and James Galley have put their wedding on hold as they search for Theo, a Brussels Griffon. They’ve hired a private investigator, passed out thousands of flyers, offered a $3,500 reward and taken to social media in their efforts to bring Theo home. King is still confident Theo will be found. “Theo is my best friend, we did everything together — grocery shopping, the dog park — we slept nose-to-nose,” King said. “There’s something in me that knows he’s alive and knows he’s OK. All of this is happening for a reason.”

Blind Lab Survives a Week in Mountains

A 12-year-old blind yellow Labrador Retriever is back home recovering after spending seven long nights lost in the Santa Cruz Mountains in northern California. Sage’s heartbroken family and their friends had been searching for her since she wandered away from her Boulder Creek home on Feb. 24. The Lab had lost both of her eyes due to health problems. The Coles’ neighbor, firefighter Dan Estrada, had helped in the search and was keeping an eye out for her while he took an out-of-town friend for a hike in the woods on Saturday. “I look over and see Sage laying on the ground right with her head in the stream,” Estrada said. He was afraid it was too late — but then she lifted her head. “I jumped in the stream, I was super happy,” he said. “I put my arms around her and hugged her and threw her over my shoulders and carried her up the mountain.” He then brought Sage home to her ecstatic and grateful family. Estrada refused the $1,000 reward the Coles had offered for help finding Sage, so it will be donated to charity. — Read it at San Francisco’s ABC 7 New

 

Beloved Polar Bear Cub Dies at German Zoo

Fritz, an adorable 4-month-old polar bear cub at Berlin’s Tierpark Zoo, had made international headlines and was seen as the next Knut, the polar bear who’d been abandoned by his mom and was hand-reared at the Berlin Zoo. But “stunned” zoo officials announced Tuesday that the cub who’d stolen their hearts had died from liver inflammation. The baby bear’s illness came on quickly. He was found lying next to his mom on Monday morning, and despite the team’s efforts to treat him with antibiotics and painkillers, he passed away that night. — Read it at Yahoo News

 

Brother and Sister Otters Born at Oregon Zoo

In much happier news, a North American river otter named Tilly is raising two tiny pups at the Oregon Zoo. The male and female weighed 4 ounces each when they were born on Feb. 26, and they’re already twice that thanks to their mom’s diligent care. “This will be the first time Tilly has raised more than one pup at a time,” said curator Amy Cutting. “It’s exciting that they’ll be growing up together and have the opportunity to play and wrestle with each other. Tilly’s always been an extremely attentive mother, so it will be interesting to see what happens when her pups go in two different directions.” Tilly herself was taken in by the zoo when she was found orphaned and wounded in 2009. The pups haven’t yet been named, but they will likely be named after local rivers and waterways like the other otters at the zoo. — Read it from the Oregon Zoo and see photo on Facebook

Denver Giraffe Calf Steals the Spotlight

As thousands watch a live stream waiting for April the giraffe to give birth at a New York zoo, the Denver Zoo announced this week that its 23-year-old giraffe, Kipele, quietly had a baby of her own on Tuesday morning. When the zoo’s staff noticed Dobby wasn’t nursing initially, they quickly jumped in to feed him and provide critical care. Luckily, he has now started nursing and is doing well with his mom. Dobby was a surprise to the public — and to the zoo. His mom had been on birth control, and even when keepers suspected a pregnancy, they weren’t able to confirm it because she resisted attempts to do an ultrasound. But they’re thrilled to have this unexpected addition to the herd.

 

Study: Elephants Only Sleep 2 Hours a Day

African elephants may be among the shortest-sleeping mammals on earth, new research finds. After observing two female matriarchs for a month, researchers found that the elephants slept an average of just two hours per day and often go for nearly two days with no sleep. “Elephants really don’t sleep all that much, and this appears to be related to their large size,” said lead researcher Paul Manger, a professor in the School of Anatomical Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. The research confirmed Manger’s suspicion, based on what was already known about an elephant’s brain structure, that they would be very short sleepers. Some nights, when the elephants were disturbed by something, they didn’t sleep at all. The study was published in the journal PLOS ONE.

 

Rare Jaguar Sighting in Arizona

Wildlife officials are hopeful that the endangered jaguar is reestablishing itself in Arizona. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released a photo Thursday from a trail camera that was taken in November and recently retrieved. The cat is seen wandering through the Dos Cabezas Mountains, about 60 miles north of the Arizona-Mexico border. That’s the farthest north of the border that a jaguar has been seen in decades. Two other jaguars have recently been spotted in Arizona. They were both male, but officials couldn’t tell from the photo whether this cat was male or female.

Friar Dog at Monastery Gets His Own Robe

Carmelo, whose official name is Friar Bigoton (Friar Moustache), is an adorable Schnauzer who lives at a Roman Catholic monastery in Bolivia. The little guy has quickly gained fame this week, as photos of him dressed in the traditional brown robes like the monks he lives with have gone viral. Several news stories have reported Carmelo was adopted as a stray and wears the robes regularly, but the monk who shared his cute photos clarified the pup’s story this morning. In a new Facebook post, Kasper Mariusz Kapron Ofm (Order of Friars Minor) wrote that the dog wasn’t actually a stray and doesn’t always wear his robes. Instead, he was given to the monks as a Christmas gift when he was a puppy — and he sported his custom robe as a “prank” on their seminarians for Carnival this year. Still, it’s clear that the little guy is loved and adorable. — Read it from Kasper Mariusz Kapron Ofm via Facebook

 

Rare Whale Caught on Video for First Time

Two True’s beaked whales were caught on camera by students during an expedition in Portugal’s Azores Islands. Live sightings of the elusive whale species is extremely rare, and the video is the first recording of them in the wild. A study published Tuesday in the journal PeerJ includes the video, rare photos of a whale calf and further data collected from strandings and sightings of the True’s beaked whales. — Read it at Yahoo

 

Study: Warming Climate Creates Risks for Songbirds

A new report finds that rising temperatures and heat waves with a greater duration and intensity are posing a grave danger to songbirds in the Southwest. Songbirds that are common in the region, including the lesser goldfinch, house finch, cactus wren, Abert’s towhee and the curve-billed thrasher, are facing a greater risk for death by dehydration and mass die-offs under projected conditions where temperatures increase by 7 degrees Fahrenheit during summer by the end of the century. “When it’s really hot, they simply can’t evaporate enough water to stay cool, so they overheat and die of heat stroke,” said co-author Blair Wolf of the University of New Mexico. “In other cases, the high rates of evaporative water loss needed to stay cool deplete their body water pools to lethal levels.” The findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Find the best and most compelling animal stories

Two years ago, Quinn Scharn lost his leg and hip to bone cancer. When he woke up from surgery, he had decided on one thing: he wanted a dog who had three legs. After a two year search, his mom, Teresa Howell, spotted the perfect companion for her son on the Front Street Animal Shelter’s Facebook page. She picked Scharn, who’s now 12 and cancer free, up early from school and drove to the Sacramento shelter. When they got there, they found out that Logan was on hold for another family. But after visiting with him, they learned that the family had just called and changed their mind — and Logan was available. The boy and dog had made a connection, and Scharn was thrilled to bring Logan home that day. A video of their sweet story posted on Facebook by the shelter on Thursday has already been viewed more than 1 million times. — Read it at People Pets

 

Surgeons Remove 915 Coins From Sea Turtle

A 25-year-old sea turtle named Bank had life-saving surgery Monday to remove 11 pounds of coins that she’d eaten. Many Thais believe that throwing coins on turtles brings longevity, but it wasn’t good luck for Bank. The 915 coins that she’d consumed after they’d been thrown into her pool had cracked her shell, causing a life-threatening infection. It took five surgeons more than four hours to safely remove the coins while the turtle was under general anesthesia. “I felt angry that humans, whether or not they meant to do it or if they did it without thinking, had caused harm to this turtle,” said surgery team leader Nantarika Chansue. — Read it at Fox News

 

Soldier Drapes Flag Over Late K9’s Body

U.S. Air Force soldier Kyle Smith took his beloved retired military working dog, Bodza, to the veterinarian last week because the 11-year-old German Shepherd was struggling to walk. When he was told the dog was suffering from an incurable disease that affected his spinal cord, he knew he had to say goodbye. He tried to hide his heartbreak from his superiors, but they arrived at the clinic out of respect for Smith and Bodza — and his boss asked for an American flag to be placed over the dog’s body in recognition of his service. “I’ve never cried that much my entire life,” Smith said of the experience. “All of us have that dog that is so special to us … he was the nicest dog in the world.”

Blind Lab Survives a Week in Mountains

A 12-year-old blind yellow Labrador Retriever is back home recovering after spending seven long nights lost in the Santa Cruz Mountains in northern California. Sage’s heartbroken family and their friends had been searching for her since she wandered away from her Boulder Creek home on Feb. 24. The Lab had lost both of her eyes due to health problems. The Coles’ neighbor, firefighter Dan Estrada, had helped in the search and was keeping an eye out for her while he took an out-of-town friend for a hike in the woods on Saturday. “I look over and see Sage laying on the ground right with her head in the stream,” Estrada said. He was afraid it was too late — but then she lifted her head. “I jumped in the stream, I was super happy,” he said. “I put my arms around her and hugged her and threw her over my shoulders and carried her up the mountain.” He then brought Sage home to her ecstatic and grateful family. Estrada refused the $1,000 reward the Coles had offered for help finding Sage, so it will be donated to charity. — Read it at San Francisco’s ABC 7 News

 

Beloved Polar Bear Cub Dies at German Zoo

Fritz, an adorable 4-month-old polar bear cub at Berlin’s Tierpark Zoo, had made international headlines and was seen as the next Knut, the polar bear who’d been abandoned by his mom and was hand-reared at the Berlin Zoo. But “stunned” zoo officials announced Tuesday that the cub who’d stolen their hearts had died from liver inflammation. The baby bear’s illness came on quickly. He was found lying next to his mom on Monday morning, and despite the team’s efforts to treat him with antibiotics and painkillers, he passed away that night. — Read it at Yahoo News

 

Brother and Sister Otters Born at Oregon Zoo

In much happier news, a North American river otter named Tilly is raising two tiny pups at the Oregon Zoo. The male and female weighed 4 ounces each when they were born on Feb. 26, and they’re already twice that thanks to their mom’s diligent care. “This will be the first time Tilly has raised more than one pup at a time,” said curator Amy Cutting. “It’s exciting that they’ll be growing up together and have the opportunity to play and wrestle with each other. Tilly’s always been an extremely attentive mother, so it will be interesting to see what happens when her pups go in two different directions.” Tilly herself was taken in by the zoo when she was found orphaned and wounded in 2009. The pups haven’t yet been named, but they will likely be named after local rivers and waterways like the other otters at the zoo. — Read it from the Oregon Zoo and see photo on Facebook

Service Pup Named for WWII Vet

Before a celebration for his 100th birthday, World War II veteran Norval Nichols asked that in lieu of gifts, his friends and family should donate to Patriot PAWS, a Texas-based non-profit that trains service dogs for veterans. Nichols, who goes by Sgt. Nick, is partially blind. Although he doesn’t have a service dog himself, he wanted to give another veteran the opportunity to have one. At his celebration, Patriot PAWS had a sweet surprise for the caring vet. He met the adorable yellow Labrador Retriever puppy who’s benefiting from his generosity, and who has a special name: Sgt. Nick. So far, the veteran has raised $5,835 toward his $34,000 goal through a GoFundMe page. — Read it at NBC Dallas-Fort Worth

 

Shelter Dog Saves 3-Year-Old Girl

Peanut, a recently adopted shelter dog, is being hailed as a hero for finding a 3-year-old girl shivering near a cold river in Michigan last week. Peanut’s owners couldn’t figure out why the dog “started going crazy at our house. She was running up and down the stairs, barking and yelping,” the unidentified woman who’s Peanut’s new owner said. Her husband let the dog outside, and she “went barreling into the field behind our house at full speed,” the owner said. Her husband followed Peanut, and was shocked to find a little girl “barely hanging on for her life.” The man wrapped her in a sweatshirt, brought her inside and called 911. Sheriff’s deputies found the girl’s home, and she’s now in the custody of Child Protective Services due to the conditions they discovered. “This formerly abused dog has now saved the life of a little girl,” the shelter wrote on Facebook. — Read it at MLive.com

 

Baby Hippo Fiona Hit Big Milestone

Fiona, a hippo born six weeks early at the Cincinnati Zoo, tipped the scales at 101 pounds on Tuesday. “This significant milestone puts her closer to becoming a real hippo! She has a great appetite and is now consuming hay and grain in addition to formula,” the zoo wrote in a Facebook post. The preemie hippo has gotten critical care and 24/7 attention since she was born in January, and she’s come a long way. She’s now enjoying play time in the pool, loves playing with the hose and has even been sleeping underwater, a unique ability of hippos.

Escaped Shelter Dog Found by Lincoln Tunnel

Pandy was rescued for the second time on Tuesday afternoon. The 5-year-old Terrier has been staying at New York’s Animal Haven shelter after she was saved from the dog meat trade in Thailand. But the pooch got spooked during a walk with a volunteer on the streets of Manhattan in blizzard conditions on Tuesday, and ran 40 blocks across town. About an hour later, she was spotted by police officers near the entrance to the Lincoln Tunnel, which leads to New Jersey. They scooped up the exhausted and freezing pup and brought her to the ASCPA, where her microchip helped identify her. Pandy is now safe, warm and loved back at Animal Haven, where she’s waiting to find her forever family. “She’s tired but she’s the sweet girl she always is,” said the shelter’s executive director, Tiffany Lacey. “She’s shy and needs a patient, loving adopter.” — Read it at the New York Post

 

Study: Antarctic Penguin Numbers Double Previous Estimates

New research using aerial and ground surveys, tagging and camera images over several breeding seasons finds that the number of Adelie penguins in East Antarctica is 5.9 million — not 3.6 million, as previously thought. Previous population estimates only took breeding pairs into account. “Non-breeding birds are harder to count because they are out foraging at sea, rather than nesting in colonies on land,” said Australian Antarctic Division seabird ecologist Louise Emmerson. “However, our study in East Antarctica has shown that non-breeding Adelie penguins may be as, or more, abundant than the breeders.” On the basis of this number, the scientists estimate the global Adelie penguin population to be 14 to 16 million. — Read it at Yahoo

 

Thirsty Koalas Seek Out New Water Sources

Koalas usually rely on eucalyptus leaves for nourishment and moisture, but scientists say climate change is forcing the parched marsupials to leave their trees to get water at drinking stations. When the desperate animals scramble down from their trees and stand at the water stations, they run the risk of an attack from predators. Camera footage showed the koalas drinking water for more than 10 minutes even during the winter months last year. They expect that they drank more during the summer season, which runs from December to February, when the country’s east coast had a record-hot summer.