Monthly Archives: February 2017

Dog Who Lost Puppies

Firefighters in Harrisburg, North Carolina, came to the rescue of an orange tabby cat who found herself in a very tight spot on Wednesday. Officials think Crystal was chasing something at her home when she fell and got herself wedged in between the chimney and the decorative siding that surrounds it. Her meows helped lead firefighters to her location within the two-story chimney, and they had her out within an hour. “We used our best judgment on where we thought she could be and pulled the boards off the side of the house and cut a hole in there, and no sooner than we were sticking our hands in, her head was sticking out of that hole,” said the fire department’s public information officer, David Bradshaw. “Immediately she said, ‘Hey, I’m getting out of here.’ She climbed out right into the firefighter’s arms.”

 

New Dwarf Primate Discovered in Africa

Researchers from the U.K. detected a new species of bush baby — a tiny, bug-eyed mammal — living deep in an African jungle. The team found the 6-inch mammal when it noticed one of the calls they were hearing didn’t sound anything like the 18 known species of bush baby, also known as a galago. The Angolan dwarf galago or Galagoides kumbirensis, is named for the forest where it was found. Unfortunately, the new species may already be endangered due to deforestation in its habitat. The species is described in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

 

Couple Postpones Wedding for Missing Dog

A Hollywood makeup artist and her fiancé, a Silicon Valley executive, are going all-out to try to find their beloved dog, who ran off from his pet sitter on Feb. 13. Trendee King and James Galley have put their wedding on hold as they search for Theo, a Brussels Griffon. They’ve hired a private investigator, passed out thousands of flyers, offered a $3,500 reward and taken to social media in their efforts to bring Theo home. King is still confident Theo will be found. “Theo is my best friend, we did everything together — grocery shopping, the dog park — we slept nose-to-nose,” King said. “There’s something in me that knows he’s alive and knows he’s OK. All of this is happening for a reason.”

Firefighters Save Dog From Cliff

A crew of 16 San Francisco firefighters came to the rescue of a dog who tumbled over a ledge and down a steep cliff in the Golden Gate National Recreation area on Wednesday. The dog got stuck on a ledge after the fall. The crew dropped ropes down the cliffside and lowered one firefighter down to get the dog. The firefighter and dog were then carefully pulled back up the embankment in a dramatic scene that was captured on video and shared on Twitter by the fire department. The dog was in an offleash area, but a spokesman for the San Francisco Fire Department recommends “animals need to be within range for verbal commands, and people need to be responsible and keep their animals away from the Cliffside.” However, he said the dog sitter who was with the pooch at the time did the right thing by calling for help instead of attempting to rescue the dog on his own.

 

Cat Owners Not at Risk for Psychosis

Past studies have found that kids who grow up with cats are at a higher risk for mental health issues linked to a parasite cats are known to carry. But a new study has good news for cat owners. “There is no evidence that cats pose a risk to children’s mental health,” said study lead author Francesca Solmi of University College London. For the new study, researchers analyzed data from nearly 5,000 kids born in England between 1991 and 1992, and followed them until they were 18. Overall, there was no link between cat ownership and symptoms of psychosis at ages 13 or 18. “Previous studies reporting links between cat ownership and psychosis simply failed to adequately control for other possible explanations” for the link, Solmi said. The study was published in the journal Psychological Medicine.

 

Giraffe Calf Gets Her Name at Maryland Zoo

Visitors at the Maryland Zoo have gotten their first glimpse of a female reticulated giraffe born on Feb. 6 to 4-year-old mom, Juma, and 11-year-old dad, Caesar. After a public vote, the zoo revealed Thursday that the baby has been named Willow. “Juma is an amazing mother! Her instincts are on target,” said Erin Cantwell, mammal collection manager. “She is very attentive and has been very patient with the calf as she learns to nurse. Mother and calf are bonding well and appear to be settling into their new routine with ease. All the other giraffes are curious about this new addition — it’s fun to watch them watching the calf.”

Cat Freed From Chimney

Firefighters in Harrisburg, North Carolina, came to the rescue of an orange tabby cat who found herself in a very tight spot on Wednesday. Officials think Crystal was chasing something at her home when she fell and got herself wedged in between the chimney and the decorative siding that surrounds it. Her meows helped lead firefighters to her location within the two-story chimney, and they had her out within an hour. “We used our best judgment on where we thought she could be and pulled the boards off the side of the house and cut a hole in there, and no sooner than we were sticking our hands in, her head was sticking out of that hole,” said the fire department’s public information officer, David Bradshaw. “Immediately she said, ‘Hey, I’m getting out of here.’ She climbed out right into the firefighter’s arms.”

 

New Dwarf Primate Discovered in Africa

Researchers from the U.K. detected a new species of bush baby — a tiny, bug-eyed mammal — living deep in an African jungle. The team found the 6-inch mammal when it noticed one of the calls they were hearing didn’t sound anything like the 18 known species of bush baby, also known as a galago. The Angolan dwarf galago or Galagoides kumbirensis, is named for the forest where it was found. Unfortunately, the new species may already be endangered due to deforestation in its habitat. The species is described in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

 

A Hollywood makeup artist and her fiancé, a Silicon Valley executive, are going all-out to try to find their beloved dog, who ran off from his pet sitter on Feb. 13. Trendee King and James Galley have put their wedding on hold as they search for Theo, a Brussels Griffon. They’ve hired a private investigator, passed out thousands of flyers, offered a $3,500 reward and taken to social media in their efforts to bring Theo home. King is still confident Theo will be found. “Theo is my best friend, we did everything together — grocery shopping, the dog park — we slept nose-to-nose,” King said. “There’s something in me that knows he’s alive and knows he’s OK. All of this is happening for a reason.”

Blind Lab Survives a Week in Mountains

A 12-year-old blind yellow Labrador Retriever is back home recovering after spending seven long nights lost in the Santa Cruz Mountains in northern California. Sage’s heartbroken family and their friends had been searching for her since she wandered away from her Boulder Creek home on Feb. 24. The Lab had lost both of her eyes due to health problems. The Coles’ neighbor, firefighter Dan Estrada, had helped in the search and was keeping an eye out for her while he took an out-of-town friend for a hike in the woods on Saturday. “I look over and see Sage laying on the ground right with her head in the stream,” Estrada said. He was afraid it was too late — but then she lifted her head. “I jumped in the stream, I was super happy,” he said. “I put my arms around her and hugged her and threw her over my shoulders and carried her up the mountain.” He then brought Sage home to her ecstatic and grateful family. Estrada refused the $1,000 reward the Coles had offered for help finding Sage, so it will be donated to charity. — Read it at San Francisco’s ABC 7 New

 

Beloved Polar Bear Cub Dies at German Zoo

Fritz, an adorable 4-month-old polar bear cub at Berlin’s Tierpark Zoo, had made international headlines and was seen as the next Knut, the polar bear who’d been abandoned by his mom and was hand-reared at the Berlin Zoo. But “stunned” zoo officials announced Tuesday that the cub who’d stolen their hearts had died from liver inflammation. The baby bear’s illness came on quickly. He was found lying next to his mom on Monday morning, and despite the team’s efforts to treat him with antibiotics and painkillers, he passed away that night. — Read it at Yahoo News

 

Brother and Sister Otters Born at Oregon Zoo

In much happier news, a North American river otter named Tilly is raising two tiny pups at the Oregon Zoo. The male and female weighed 4 ounces each when they were born on Feb. 26, and they’re already twice that thanks to their mom’s diligent care. “This will be the first time Tilly has raised more than one pup at a time,” said curator Amy Cutting. “It’s exciting that they’ll be growing up together and have the opportunity to play and wrestle with each other. Tilly’s always been an extremely attentive mother, so it will be interesting to see what happens when her pups go in two different directions.” Tilly herself was taken in by the zoo when she was found orphaned and wounded in 2009. The pups haven’t yet been named, but they will likely be named after local rivers and waterways like the other otters at the zoo. — Read it from the Oregon Zoo and see photo on Facebook

Denver Giraffe Calf Steals the Spotlight

As thousands watch a live stream waiting for April the giraffe to give birth at a New York zoo, the Denver Zoo announced this week that its 23-year-old giraffe, Kipele, quietly had a baby of her own on Tuesday morning. When the zoo’s staff noticed Dobby wasn’t nursing initially, they quickly jumped in to feed him and provide critical care. Luckily, he has now started nursing and is doing well with his mom. Dobby was a surprise to the public — and to the zoo. His mom had been on birth control, and even when keepers suspected a pregnancy, they weren’t able to confirm it because she resisted attempts to do an ultrasound. But they’re thrilled to have this unexpected addition to the herd.

 

Study: Elephants Only Sleep 2 Hours a Day

African elephants may be among the shortest-sleeping mammals on earth, new research finds. After observing two female matriarchs for a month, researchers found that the elephants slept an average of just two hours per day and often go for nearly two days with no sleep. “Elephants really don’t sleep all that much, and this appears to be related to their large size,” said lead researcher Paul Manger, a professor in the School of Anatomical Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. The research confirmed Manger’s suspicion, based on what was already known about an elephant’s brain structure, that they would be very short sleepers. Some nights, when the elephants were disturbed by something, they didn’t sleep at all. The study was published in the journal PLOS ONE.

 

Rare Jaguar Sighting in Arizona

Wildlife officials are hopeful that the endangered jaguar is reestablishing itself in Arizona. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released a photo Thursday from a trail camera that was taken in November and recently retrieved. The cat is seen wandering through the Dos Cabezas Mountains, about 60 miles north of the Arizona-Mexico border. That’s the farthest north of the border that a jaguar has been seen in decades. Two other jaguars have recently been spotted in Arizona. They were both male, but officials couldn’t tell from the photo whether this cat was male or female.